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Surgical Technology International I contains 66 peer-reviewed articles featuring the latest advances in surgical techniques and technologies.

 

1991 - ISBN 1 85745 020 5

 

1 year Institutional Subscription 

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Introduction by Ben Eiseman MD, FACS

Sections

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

 

Aesthetic Plastic Surgery of the Upper Face
Bruno Ristow MD, Chief, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Division, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California

01-325

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Abstract

The decade of the 1990s will witness even greater public enthusiasm for aesthetic surgery of the face than previously seen. Several reasons contribute to this increase in number of procedures, among them longevity, better health, nutrition, increased competitiveness in the job market and improvements in general anaesthesia.

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Application of the Threedimensional CT Scan to the Reconstruction of Craniofacial Deformities
Bryant A. Toth MD, Chief, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Children's Hospital of Northern California, Oakland, California
Bryan G. Forley MD, Chief, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Saint Francis Memorial Hospital, San Francisco and Attending Surgeon, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California

01-339

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Abstract

New developments in computerised tomography (CT) imaging technology have paralleled advances in craniofacial surgical techniques. The ability to reconstruct congenital, neoplastic, and traumatic deformities is dependent upon good pre-operative assessment. Understanding the spatial relationship of a given deformity is limited with conventional two-dimensional CT scans. A more precise, reproducible portrayal of the craniofacial problem has been' made possible with the development of three-dimensional CT scan capabilities.

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Recent Advances in Breast Reconstruction
Neal Handel MD, FACS, The Breast Center, Van Nuys, California

01-345

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Abstract

The incidence of breast cancer in the United States is high and appears to be increasing. The American cancer Society has estimated that one in nine American women (11 percent) will eventually develop breast carcinoma. Recently there has been a dramatic shift away from mastectomy and toward breast-conserving therapy (Iumpectomy, axillary node dissection and whole breast irradiation). In some centres the majority of breast cancer patients are now treated with conservation therapy. Some patients, however, are not candidates for radiation, because of the size, location or histology of their tumour and are still best treated by mastectomy and reconstruction. Women who develop local recurrence following radiation therapy are likewise candidates for mastectomy with reconstruction. Additionally, there is a large group of women who had mastectomies in years past who have not had reconstruction. Thus many patients may potentially benefit from breast reconstruction.

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Present Status of Microsurgical Replantation
Harry J. Buncke MD, The Microsurgical Replantation, Transplantation Department, Davies Medical Center, San Francisco, California, Gregory M. Buncke MD, The Microsurgical Replantation, Transplantation Department, Davies Medical Center, San Francisco, California, William C. Lineaweaver MD, The Microsurgical Replantation, Transplantation Department, Davies Medical Center, San Francisco, California, Alfonso Oliva MD, The Microsurgical Replantation, Transplantation Department, Davies Medical Center, San Francisco, California

01-357

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Abstract

The replantation of amputated parts has stimulated the imagination of writers since antiquity. It was not until the successful replantation of an arm by Malt and a hand by Chen Chung Wei in 1953 that these fables became reality. The simultaneous development of the field of microsurgery permitting the repair of one millimetre vessels made possible the replantation of structures fed by these small vessels such as fingers, ears, noses, lips, scalps and penises.

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